Archive for June, 2012

1. DO NOT EXPECT YOUR PARAMEDIC TO SHARE YOUR DISCOMFORT.
Involvement with the patient’s suffering might cause him to lose valuable scientific objectivity.

2. BE CHEERFUL AT ALL TIMES.
Your Paramedic leads a busy and trying life and requires all the gentleness and reassurance he can get.

3. TRY TO SUFFER FROM THE DISEASE FOR WHICH YOU ARE BEING TREATED.
Remember that your Paramedic has a professional reputation to uphold.

4. DO NOT COMPLAIN IF THE TREATMENT FAILS TO BRING RELIEF. You must believe that your Paramedic has achieved a deep insight into the true nature of your illness, which transcends any mere permanent disability you may have experienced.

5. NEVER ASK YOUR PARAMEDIC TO EXPLAIN WHAT HE IS DOING OR WHY HE IS DOING IT.
It is presumptuous to assume that such profound matters could be explained in terms that you would understand.

6. SUBMIT TO NOVEL EXPERIMENTAL TREATMENT READILY. Though the invasive procedure may not benefit you directly, the resulting research paper will surely be of widespread interest.

7. PAY YOUR MEDICAL BILLS PROMPTLY AND WILLINGLY.
You should consider it a privilege to contribute, however modestly, to the well-being of Paramedics and other humanitarians.

8. DO NOT SUFFER FROM AILMENTS THAT YOU CANNOT AFFORD. It is sheer arrogance to contract illnesses that are beyond your means.

9. NEVER REVEAL ANY OF THE SHORTCOMINGS THAT HAVE COME TO LIGHT IN THE COURSE OF TREATMENT BY YOUR PARAMEDIC.
The patient-Paramedic relationship is a privileged one, and you have a sacred duty to protect him from exposure.

10. NEVER DIE WHILE IN YOUR PARAMEDIC’S PRESENCE OR UNDER HIS DIRECT CARE.
This will only cause him needless inconvenience and embarrassment.

Officer Kathleen Callery was the first officer on scene, and was quickly joined by Officer Chris Hunt and Officer Michael Frybarger. The trio administered CPR and an AED shock while waiting for an ambulance to arrive. As the officers worked to save Seamans’ life, nurse Laurie Mills drove past the scene. She jumped in to assist the officers, helping to administer chest compressions as medics arrived. EMS took over CPR, and within minutes, Seamans was breathing on his own. Seamans was transported to Rapid City Regional Hospital, where he recovered and was released several days later.

Mills was honored for her assistance with the Community Service Award. Chief Allender also awarded Officers Callery, Hunt, and Frybarger with the Life Saving Medal for their swift response. The Life Saving Medal may be given to officers for an act performed in the line of duty that, through disregard of personal safety or prompt and alert action, results in saving a life.